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🔰The NEP’s four-year degree proposal: Lessons from the DU experience

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The National Education Policy (NEP) has brought the idea once again into the spotlight and suggests its execution the nation over Six years after Delhi University’s (DU) four-year degree test finished in shame, with the University Grants Commission (UGC) closing down the program after vociferous fights from a segment of understudies and staff, the National Education Policy (NEP) has brought the idea once more into the spotlight and suggests its usage the nation over.

For the then DU bad habit chancellor Dinesh Singh, who needed to leave when his brainchild program was struck down, the NEP is something of a vindication. “The NEP proposition mirrors numerous parts of our program at DU. We had additionally proposed an all-encompassing, adaptable instructive experience,” he says, taking note of that he was focusing on more extensive change than the straightforward option of an additional year.

He relates the experience of discovering that top multinational finance companies that interviewed 1,200 students at DU had found only three worth hiring because students simply did not have basic holistic knowledge to succeed in the real world.

“Professors need to be able to make connections between multiple disciplines. It will take time for such a culture to evolve, but we must provide a holistic atmosphere conducive to such a change,” he says. professors need to be able to make connections between multiple disciplines. It will take time for such a culture to evolve, but we must provide a holistic atmosphere conducive to such a change,” he says. In that one year that we implemented the four-year degree, DU shot up to around 200 in the global rankings, higher than most IITs. Today, it is around the 800-rank mark,” he says.

The head of the NEP’s drafting committee K. Kasturirangan agrees that Professor Singh’s initiative was a “visionary step” at that time. “We must recognise that a student’s knowledge base must be sufficiently flexible to cope with a 21st century job scenario,” he says.

“Around then in DU, there was worry among understudies about whether they would pick up anything from an additional year, just as among educators protesting the extra work that would need to be placed in to show a four-year degree.”

He trusts that the unmistakable alternatives to leave the program at all levels with a particular arrangement of information and abilities will mollify understudy concerns. With respect to educators, he takes note of that additional work will come less as extra showing hours, however regarding a changed teaching method. “Professors need to be able to make connections between multiple disciplines. It will take time for such a culture to evolve, but we must provide a holistic atmosphere conducive to such a change,” he says.

Higher Education Secretary Amit Khare agrees that the change needs to go beyond simply tacking an extra year on to the existing system. “Modular courses are being prepared between now and May 2021, which will add value. Right from first to fourth year, there will be a research component. It’s not just adding a year, but restructuring from the first to the fourth year. It will be like an integrated course,” he says.

In any case, he feels that the greatest change from the obstructed DU analysis will be the quality of numbers. “Dinesh Singh was alone in that ecosystem. This time, we are saying that all the Institutes of Eminence (IoE) together will change. So, you have a group of 20 universities who are changing, not just one in the entire country,” he said. DU itself is one of the IoEs planned to pioneer the program from 2021-22.

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